You can get this error if you are trying to schedule a report and your BI Publisher installation uses LDAP authentication. To avoid it, make sure that the “Administrator” account you use to connect to your LDAP server is in the XMLP_ADMIN group. The LDAP settings are located on the Admin tab, under Security Settings / Security Configuration.
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07/25/2012   Linklog:  Apple Discussion Forum: Safari 5.1.7 on my MacBookPro OSX 10.7.4 freezes unexpectedly

Lately I’ve been experiencing strange problems when clicking on links in Safari 5.1.7. Usually the progress indicator would either flash momentarily and do nothing, or else it would never appear at all. Pages would sometimes load, but after an unusual delay and with no indication that the browser was actually doing anything. I switched to Chrome as my default browser for a few days, but that was about all I could stand. A little research on the forums showed this fix, which appears to have worked for me.



I’ve been fighting for a couple of years now with an annoying performance bug in SQL Developer for OS X. After using the application for a while CPU usage would spike to around 100%, even when idle. This is a known issue associated with the “Look and Feel” preference. Basically, don’t use the “Mac OS X” setting. Instead, use the “Oracle” setting. The theme doesn’t matter. That fixes the CPU issue, but somewhat annoyingly moves the menu out of the menu bar at the top of the screen and into the application window, a la Windows, making the interface inconsistent with pretty much every other app I use on my Mac.
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Need to run your company’s Oracle Forms application from your Mac, and can’t? Annoyed with having to crank up a virtual machine for just that one task? Even with the latest published Java version for OS X (1.6.0_33, as of today), you may find that some of the newer Forms applications just won’t run. Well, fret no longer. A solution may already be here, at least for Safari and Firefox.
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Here is a short and simple Perl CGI script that you can use to expose the hostname of your web server, as opposed to just the server/domain portion of the URL string: #!/usr/bin/perl print "Content-type: text/html\n\n"; print `hostname`; 1; Name the file something like hostname.cgi and place it in your web server’s /cgi-bin/ directory, or if your web server is configured appropriately, just name it hostname.pl and drop it wherever you like.
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One of the great things about working for Enkitec is that it’s a very Mac-friendly shop. When I arrived there in 2007 there were a handful of us running Macs and the attitude at the top seemed to be respectful, but skeptical. They allowed me to use my own laptop, which at the time was a 15-inch Intel Core2 Duo Macbook Pro, with the understanding that I could request a standard-issue Dell laptop at any time should the need arise.
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Use DML Error Logging

06/07/2012  in Splaining using tags oracle , sql , sqlloader

Introduced with Oracle 10gR2, DML Error Logging allows you to make standard SQL INSERT, UPDATE, and MERGE statements behave more like the SQL*Loader utility, logging errors to a table rather than failing and rolling back the first time an error condition is encountered. The syntax is the same for all DML statements. Just add the following clause to the end of your DML: LOG ERRORS The database will automatically create an error log table for you.
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06/01/2012   Linklog:  Craig Shallahamer: Oracle Database Row versus Set Processing, Surprise!

To folks writing database-driven reports for the web: Craig Shallahamer shows why you should let the (Oracle) database handle as much of your selection and transformation logic as possible.


05/25/2012   Linklog:  Jake Feasel: SQLFiddle

Build your own mini-schema and run queries against it. Publish your experiments for your friends to tweak. Or try out the examples from your favorite SQL book without having to build a database first. Works for Oracle, PostgreSQL, MySQL, and SQL Server flavors. Pretty cool!



I ran into an interesting problem recently when attempting to publish an MS Access application with Citrix XenApp. The application pulled data from an Oracle database, so an ODBC connection was created on the Citrix server. What we found was that when a non-privileged user tried to run the application, the connection failed. When the Citrix server admin ran it, however, it worked. Furthermore, as long as the admin was logged in, anybody else could run the application successfully; when he logged out, the users’ connections broke again.
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